In an increasingly interconnected world, more light is being cast on the social conditions of every people, giving greater visibility to their circumstances.

While there are developments that give hope, there is much that should weigh heavy on the conscience of the human race. Inequity, discrimination, and exploitation blight the life of humanity, seemingly immune to the treatments applied by political schemes of every hue. The economic impact of these afflictions has resulted in the prolonged suffering of so many, as well as in deep-seated, structural defects in society.

No one whose heart has been attracted to the teachings of the Blessed Beauty [Baha’u’llah] can remain unmoved by these consequences:

The world is in great turmoil… and the minds of its people are in a state of utter confusion. We entreat the Almighty that He may graciously illuminate them with the glory of His Justice, and enable them to discover that which will be profitable unto them at all times and under all conditions. – Baha’u’llah, Tablets of Baha’u’llah, p. 94.

As the Baha’i community strives to contribute at the level of thought and action to the betterment of the world, the adverse conditions experienced by many populations will more and more demand its attention.

Syrian-childrenThe welfare of any segment of humanity is inextricably bound up with the welfare of the whole. Humanity’s collective life suffers when any one group thinks of its own well-being in isolation from that of its neighbours’ or pursues economic gain without regard for how the natural environment, which provides sustenance for all, is affected. A stubborn obstruction, then, stands in the way of meaningful social progress: time and again, avarice and self-interest prevail at the expense of the common good. Unconscionable quantities of wealth are being amassed, and the instability this creates is made worse by how income and opportunity are spread so unevenly both between nations and within nations.

But it need not be so. However much such conditions are the outcome of history, they do not have to define the future, and even if current approaches to economic life satisfied humanity’s stage of adolescence, they are certainly inadequate for its dawning age of maturity. There is no justification for continuing to perpetuate structures, rules, and systems that manifestly fail to serve the interests of all peoples. The teachings of the Faith leave no room for doubt: there is an inherent moral dimension to the generation, distribution, and utilization of wealth and resources.

The stresses emerging out of the long-term process of transition from a divided world to a united one are being felt within international relations as much as in the deepening fractures that affect societies large and small. With prevailing modes of thought found to be badly wanting, the world is in desperate need of a shared ethic, a sure framework for addressing the crises that gather like storm clouds. The vision of Baha’u’llah challenges many of the assumptions that are allowed to shape contemporary discourse—for instance, that self-interest, far from needing to be restrained, drives prosperity, and that progress depends upon its expression through relentless competition.

To view the worth of an individual chiefly in terms of how much one can accumulate and how many goods one can consume relative to others is wholly alien to Baha’i thought. But neither are the teachings in sympathy with sweeping dismissals of wealth as inherently distasteful or immoral, and asceticism is prohibited. Wealth must serve humanity. Its use must accord with spiritual principles; systems must be created in their light. And, in Baha’u’llah’s memorable words:

No light can compare with the light of justice. The establishment of order in the world and the tranquillity of the nations depend upon it. –  Epistle to the Son of the Wolf, pp. 28-29.

Although Baha’u’llah does not set out in His Revelation a detailed economic system, a constant theme throughout the entire corpus of His teachings is the reorganization of human society. Consideration of this theme inevitably gives rise to questions of economics. Of course, the future order conceived by Baha’u’llah is far beyond anything that can be imagined by the present generation. Nevertheless, its eventual emergence will depend on strenuous effort by His followers to put His teachings into effect today. With this in mind, we hope that the comments below will stimulate thoughtful, ongoing reflection …. The aim is to learn about how to participate in the material affairs of society in a way that is consistent with the divine precepts and how, in practical terms, collective prosperity can be advanced through justice and generosity, collaboration and mutual assistance.
This article, the first part of a two-part series, contains selected excerpts from the initial portion of a March 1, 2017 letter from the Universal House of Justice, the democratically-elected global Baha’i administrative body, to the Baha’is of the world. The next article will contain excerpts from the final portion of the letter. You can access the entire letter here.

The opinions and views expressed in this article are those of the author only and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of BahaiTeachings.org or any institution of the Baha’i Faith.

2 Comments

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  • Melanie Black
    Mar 21, 2017
    I've often been dismayed and disheartened that the nation in which I live, the USA, consumes such an inordinate share of the world's resources. This has been going on for quite some time and is a gross injustice. As I see it, I believe that in time my fellow citizens will have to learn how to live simpler lives. Simpler needn't mean a lesser quality of life at all. From all of the stories I've heard from Baha'is who've lived in other parts of the world, it can often mean happier and more contented. But it may be a rocky ...road to get there. I certainly can't predict the future.
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  • Sophie Uzel
    Mar 21, 2017
    Dear friends, I believe that when excerpts of various letters are given, they should be in inverted commas for the sake of clarity and so that distinction can be made between the voice of the author of the article and excerpts of various writings. Thank you.